George Washington Carver American Hero

“There is no education like adversity.”
–Benjamin Disraeli

George Washington Carver the trail-blazing scientist whose experiments with plants laid the groundwork
for today’s research on plant-based fuels, and everyday products.
George Washington Carver was born into slavery around 1864 in Diamond Grove, Missouri…
a frail and sickly child most of his young life. He was so ill suited for work in the field that his owner traded young George for a broken down race horse.

I often wonder how this boy could ever dream of being free and educated.
The harshness of his existence and the nonexistence of a single role model baffles the mind.

The accomplishments of George Washington Carver are too many to list, but I’ll try to capture just a slice of amazing facts about this humble and very noble man.
George Washington Carver had 325 global products made from Peanuts, and he had 155 global products made from sweet potatoes. In 1918 the great inventor Thomas Edison offered George Washington Carver
$200,000 to come work for him at an annual salary of $100,000.

During World War 1 he worked to replace textile dyes that were being imported from Europe.
George Washington Carver produced over 500 different shades.

George Washington Carver did not have anyone before him to lead the way…no there was no
NAACP, no Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., no John or Robert Kennedy.

Just a single slave boy who prayed to Jesus everyday of his life with a resolve to make all his dreams come true. No child today has an excuse not to make their dreams come true, no just look at the life of George Washington Carver and you will realize that there is a way, if there is the will.

George Washington Carver is the most accomplished American Hero of the 20th century.
A monument showing Dr. Carver as a boy was the first national memorial erected in honor
of a Black American.

“Where there is no vision, there is no hope.”
–George Washington Carver

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