Albert Einstein Extraordinary Physicist of 20th Century

“Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure
about the universe.” –Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist born in Switzerland on
March 14, 1879. He developed the general theory of relativity, one of two pillars of
modern physics. He produced his greatest contributions to math and physics when he was
just twenty-six years old.

In 1905, while working as a patent office clerk in Bern, Switzerland he wrote four papers
that are each regarded as works of genius. It was the year 1905, known as
“annus mirabillis” Einstein’s year of miracles.

Albert Einstein’s first paper, “On a Heuristic Viewpoint Concerning the Production and
Transformation of Light” proposed that light was made up of small pockets of energy called
energy quanta. This view was the theory that won him the Noble Prize in physics in 1921.

Albert Einstein’s papers on the theory of relativity were a continuation of the work he
began when he was only sixteen years old.

Albert Einstein was asked at one point in his life to become the second president of Israel,
but he refused the offer, saying he lacked the people skills for such a position.

Today, thousands of Albert Einstein’s artifacts are available online.
The Albert Einstein Papers Project is currently edited by Diana Kormos-Buchwald, a professor
of physics and history science at the California Institute of Technology.
The Einstein papers are available at: einsteinpapers.press.princeton.edu.

Albert Einstein died on this day of April 18, 1955.

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Footnote:

In August 1939 Albert Einstein wrote a short letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt expressing his
fear that Nazi Germany might develop an atomic bomb out of uranium.
Soon the United States developed the Manhattan Project which Albert Einstein was a part of.
The Manhattan Project cost close to $100 million dollars.

Charles Micheaux
Micheaux Publishing
Atlanta, Georgia

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