Muhammad Ali & Black Women

“Lives of great men all remind us we can make our lives sublime, and,
departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time.”
–Longfellow
(A Psalm of Life)

Every black woman should teach her son about Muhammad Ali.
Every black woman should teach her son to love the legacy he leaves behind.
I did say EVERY.
I did not say some, a few, not just the married, or unmarried too.
Yes tell grandma and aunt Sue.
Tell the sisters in prison, tell the sisters in church, tell the hoes on the corner
turning a trick, GOT DAMN IT! Tell every black woman about this man,
oh God! THIS Man, named Muhammad Ali.
Tell every black woman to grab her son in loving arms and tell her son
about the giant love of Muhammad Ali.

The passing of this most noble black prince is truly a loss for our community
that cannot be weighed. Young black boys pants sagging, draws showing for all to see.
What happened to black self-pride? Was it really lost in intergration?
Really?
Got Damn It! Muhammad Ali was a sharp dresser, this brother wore his clothes better than
any king or prince that ever lived.
Look at the pictures; take your sons to the public library pick up a got damn book
and show them one of the finest men this world has ever seen, felt or touched.
Muhammad Ali look at him with that great smile or sweet grin.

Black Mothers ask yourself where is the L-O-V-E from black athletes today for our youth and community?
Black Woman I beg you, I implore you, teach your children about Muhammad Ali.

Black Fathers…hold up Brother…a word with You too.
PHUCK an NBA Play-Off… GOT DAMN It! I’m talking about Muhammad Ali.
Black women in the world have never had a better, more concerned hero of their
plight than our black prince, Muhammad Ali.

Some years ago I was cast in a play called THE GREAT WHITE HOPE, I portrayed
Jack Johnson the first black heavyweight boxing champ in America.
I learned when the play was first written for the Broadway stage in NYC, the play
was offered to Muhammad Ali; Ali after reading the play turned down the offer.
The producers would not relent and so they offered all kinds of money to Ali
to do the role but Ali shook his head negatively in the face of enormous money being offered to him.
The producers begged Ali to do the role but still Muhammad Ali refused to do the play.
One producer asked Ali why he would not do the role in light of all the money being put on the table.

Muhammad Ali told the producers of the play that he did indeed read the play and he told them there was no way he would ever offend black women by doing this role.
The white producers still did not understand what Ali was telling them about himself.

Finally Muhammad Ali broke it down:

“LOOK, YA’LL WANT ME TO BE IN MY DRAWS ON BROADWAY, HOLDING A WHITE WOMAN…
IN MY ARMS…AND TELL HER I LOVE HER?

NO! THAT AIN”T NEVER GONNA HAPPEN…
NO SIR, CAN’T DO THIS ROLE…
YOU SEE, THE WOMAN I LOVE IS A BLACK WOMAN, THAT IS MY QUEEN.
SO YA’LL FIND AN ACTOR WHO NEED THE MONEY FOR THIS ONE…I AIN”T GONNA DO THIS ONE…
KEEP YOUR MONEY.” —Muhammad Ali

James Earl Jones was later offered the role and the play later was turned into a film
also starring James Earl Jones.

I have tried hard to find a quote to best capture all the weight placed on the shoulders
of our greatest champion and one that came close to perfection I share with you now.

“What a heavy burden is a name that has become too famous.”
–Francois Marie Arouet ( French Philosopher)

Every black parent must tell their children about Muhammad Ali.

Charles Micheaux
Atlanta

****************************
You can watch Oscar Micheaux films @ YouTube.

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